Michael C. McKay

Understanding Out of Band Authentication and Its Impact on Security

authentication methods, authentication process, extra layer, layer security, mobile device, unauthorized access

What is Out of Band Authentication and How Does it Improve Security?

Authentication is a critical step in the process of verifying the identity of a user before granting access to a system or application. Traditionally, this verification was done through the use of a password, which served as a single factor of authentication. However, relying solely on a password for authentication can leave systems vulnerable to various security threats.

Out of band authentication (OOB authentication) is a method that enhances security by adding an extra layer of verification. OOB authentication involves using a separate channel or device, such as a mobile phone or token, to verify the user’s identity. This additional factor provides a more secure authentication process, as it requires the user to have access to both the password and the separate device.

By utilizing two factors for authentication, OOB authentication reduces the risk of unauthorized access. Even if an attacker were to obtain a user’s password, they would still need access to the separate device in order to successfully authenticate. This mitigates the risk of password theft or brute-force attacks that solely rely on guessing passwords.

OOB authentication offers various methods for verifying the user’s identity. One common method is through the use of one-time passwords (OTPs) sent to the user’s mobile phone. These OTPs are generated each time a login attempt is made and must be entered by the user to complete the authentication process. Another method is through the use of push notifications, where the user receives a notification on their separate device asking them to confirm the login attempt.

Overall, out of band authentication significantly enhances security by introducing an additional factor of verification. By requiring both a password and access to a separate device, systems can ensure that only authorized users are granted access. This multifactor authentication approach provides a robust security measure against password theft and unauthorized access, making it an effective solution in today’s rapidly evolving threat landscape.

Understanding Out of Band Authentication

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is a secure method of authentication that adds an extra layer of security to the login process. It involves using multiple factors to verify the identity of the user, ensuring that only authorized individuals have access to the system.

Traditional authentication methods often rely solely on a username and password combination, which can be vulnerable to security breaches. With out-of-band authentication, an additional factor is introduced, typically through a separate device. This factor can be a one-time password sent to the user’s mobile phone, a fingerprint scan, or even a voice recognition system.

By requiring the user to provide this second factor of authentication from a different device or communication channel, out-of-band authentication significantly reduces the risk of unauthorized access. Even if an attacker manages to obtain the user’s password, they would still need access to the user’s registered device or receiving channel to complete the authentication process.

The use of multiple factors for authentication adds an extra layer of security, as it combines something the user knows (password) with something the user possesses (registered device) or something the user is (biometric data). This multifactor authentication helps protect against various types of attacks, including password guessing, brute force attacks, and phishing attempts.

In addition to enhancing security, out-of-band authentication also provides a seamless user experience. Once the initial login is complete, subsequent verifications can be performed in the background without requiring any user input, making it a convenient and efficient method of authentication.

Definition and Purpose

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is a secure multifactor authentication method used to verify the identity of a user during the login process. It adds an extra layer of security by using two separate channels or factors for authentication, typically combining something the user knows (password) with something the user possesses (a mobile device).

The purpose of OOBA is to provide enhanced security by requiring users to authenticate their identity using factors that are out of band, meaning they are not transmitted over the same channel as the access request. This helps to protect against potential threats such as phishing or man-in-the-middle attacks, where an attacker intercepts the login credentials.

With OOBA, the user typically enters their password on the login page, and then receives a verification code or request on their mobile device. They must then enter this code back into the login page to complete the authentication process. By using two separate channels, the user’s identity is confirmed using different methods, making it more difficult for attackers to gain unauthorized access.

OOBA can be implemented using various methods, such as sending the verification code via SMS text message, email, or through a dedicated authentication app. The use of a mobile device as the out-of-band factor adds an extra layer of security, as the device is typically tied to the user’s physical possession and can be more difficult for an attacker to compromise.

In summary, the purpose of Out of Band Authentication is to enhance the security of the login process by using two separate channels or factors for authentication, making it more difficult for unauthorized individuals to gain access to sensitive information or accounts.

How Out of Band Authentication Works

Out of Band Authentication is a method of identity verification that adds an extra layer of security to the traditional login process. It involves using multiple factors to authenticate a user’s access to a system or application. One common factor is the use of a password, but with out of band authentication, an additional factor is added to enhance security.

The additional factor in out of band authentication is typically a second device, such as a smartphone or a hardware token, which is separate from the device being used for the login. This second device is used to receive a one-time authentication code or a push notification, which the user must enter or approve in order to complete the login process.

By using two separate devices for authentication, out of band authentication provides a higher level of security. Even if a user’s password is compromised, an attacker would not be able to access the account without also having physical possession of the second device.

Furthermore, out of band authentication can use different communication methods to transmit the authentication code or push notification. This can include SMS messages, email, or even phone calls. By using different channels to transmit the second factor, the security of the authentication process is further increased.

Overall, out of band authentication is a secure and effective method of protecting sensitive data and systems. It adds an extra layer of security by requiring the use of a second device and multiple authentication factors. This makes it more difficult for attackers to gain unauthorized access, enhancing the overall security of the system or application.

Advantages of Out of Band Authentication

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) offers several advantages to enhance security for login and access processes. By utilizing two separate communication channels, it adds an extra layer of protection to user identity authentication.

One of the main advantages of OOBA is that it provides multifactor authentication, requiring users to provide two or more factors to verify their identity. In addition to the traditional password, users must also have access to a secondary device, such as a mobile phone or email account, to complete the authentication process.

This multifactor authentication significantly improves the security of online accounts and transactions by making it much more difficult for unauthorized individuals to gain access. Even if a password is compromised, the additional out-of-band factor serves as an extra barrier, providing an additional layer of protection for user accounts.

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OOBA also offers secure authentication methods that are resistant to common attacks such as phishing and man-in-the-middle attacks. By using a separate channel, such as a mobile app or SMS verification, it is more difficult for attackers to intercept the authentication process and mimic the user.

Furthermore, OOBA allows for a seamless user experience, as it eliminates the need for users to remember complex passwords and regularly change them. Instead, users can rely on their secondary device, which acts as a trusted factor to authenticate their identity.

In summary, the advantages of out-of-band authentication include enhanced security through multifactor authentication, resistance to common attacks, and a more user-friendly experience. By utilizing two separate communication channels, OOBA provides an added layer of protection for online accounts and transactions.

Enhancing Security with Out of Band Authentication

In the modern digital world, where cyber threats continue to evolve, traditional methods of login and identity verification are no longer sufficient to protect sensitive information. As a result, organizations are turning to multifactor authentication methods to enhance security and ensure a higher level of identity assurance.

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is one such method that adds an extra layer of security to the login process. It involves using two separate channels or devices to verify the identity of the user. In this approach, the user is required to provide their login credentials, typically a username and password, as the first factor. Then, a second factor, such as a unique code or fingerprint, is sent to a separate device, such as a mobile phone or email account, to confirm the user’s identity.

This two-factor authentication ensures that even if an attacker manages to obtain the user’s password, they would still need access to the user’s separate device to complete the verification process. This makes it significantly more difficult for unauthorized individuals to gain access to sensitive information or perform fraudulent activities.

OOBA provides a highly secure method of authentication by utilizing separate communication channels or devices. This separation reduces the risk of interception, as the login credentials are transmitted through one channel, while the verification code or fingerprint is sent through another. By segregating the authentication factors through out of band means, organizations can minimize the vulnerabilities associated with single-channel authentication processes.

Furthermore, OOBA offers additional benefits such as flexibility and convenience. Users can choose the second factor of authentication that suits their preferences or requirements, whether it is receiving a code via SMS, email, or using biometric authentication methods. This customization ensures a seamless user experience while maintaining high-security standards.

In conclusion, Out of Band Authentication is an effective method for enhancing security in the login and identity verification process. By utilizing separate channels or devices to verify a user’s identity, organizations can strengthen their security posture and reduce the risk of unauthorized access. With the increasing prevalence of cyber threats, implementing out of band authentication methods is vital for protecting sensitive information and ensuring a secure digital environment.

Protection Against Phishing Attacks

Phishing attacks are one of the most common and dangerous threats to online security. They involve the use of deceptive tactics to trick users into revealing their sensitive information, such as passwords or personal data. Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) provides an effective solution to protect against phishing attacks by adding an extra layer of security during the authentication process.

OOBA involves the use of multiple factors for verification, ensuring that only authorized users can gain access to their accounts. This typically involves the use of a second device or channel, such as a mobile phone, to verify the user’s identity. By requiring the use of a second factor for authentication, even if an attacker manages to obtain the user’s password through a phishing attack, they would still need access to the second device or channel to gain entry.

One of the most secure methods of out of band authentication is the use of two-factor authentication (2FA). This involves the combination of something the user knows (such as a password) with something they have (such as a mobile device). When the user attempts to log in, they will receive a verification code on their mobile device, which they must enter along with their password to complete the authentication process.

Another form of out of band authentication is known as multifactor authentication (MFA), which goes beyond two factors for verification. MFA typically combines something the user knows (password), something they have (mobile device), and something they are (biometric data) to create a more robust identity verification process. This not only protects against phishing attacks but also provides additional layers of security against other threats such as credential stuffing or brute-force attacks.

In summary, out of band authentication adds an extra layer of security to the login process, protecting against phishing attacks. By using multiple factors for verification, such as a second device or channel, it ensures that only authorized users can access their accounts. Two-factor authentication and multifactor authentication are two effective methods of implementing out of band authentication and enhancing overall online security.

Preventing Man-in-the-Middle Attacks

Preventing Man-in-the-Middle Attacks

A man-in-the-middle attack is a type of cyber attack where an attacker intercepts communication between two parties, often without their knowledge, in order to eavesdrop, steal information, or impersonate one of the parties. This can be a serious threat to the security and integrity of online transactions and communications.

To prevent man-in-the-middle attacks, it is crucial to implement strong authentication methods. One effective approach is to use multifactor authentication, which requires users to provide multiple factors to verify their identity and gain access to a system or account.

A common multifactor authentication method is the combination of a password and a second factor, such as a one-time password generated by a mobile device or a biometric verification such as a fingerprint or facial recognition. This two-factor authentication adds an extra layer of security by ensuring that even if an attacker manages to steal a user’s password, they would still need access to the second factor in order to successfully log in.

Out-of-band authentication is another secure method for preventing man-in-the-middle attacks. This involves using separate communication channels or devices for different factors of authentication. For example, when logging in to a secure system, a user might receive a verification code via SMS on their mobile device, which they enter in addition to their password. This ensures that even if an attacker intercepts the communication channel used for the password, they would not have access to the verification code sent via a different channel.

By implementing these secure authentication methods, organizations can significantly reduce the risk of man-in-the-middle attacks and ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of their systems and data. It is important for users to be aware of these security measures and take appropriate measures to protect their identities and online accounts.

Securing Access to Sensitive Information

Securing Access to Sensitive Information

Securing access to sensitive information is of paramount importance in today’s digital world. With the increasing number of data breaches and cyberattacks, it is crucial to implement robust security measures to protect sensitive data from unauthorized access.

Authentication plays a vital role in securing access to sensitive information. By verifying the identity of users, authentication ensures that only authorized individuals can gain access to confidential data. Password-based authentication is one of the most commonly used methods for authentication. However, relying solely on passwords can pose security risks, as they can be easily compromised or forgotten.

To enhance the security of access to sensitive information, organizations are adopting multi-factor authentication (MFA) methods. MFA combines two or more factors, such as something the user knows (password), something the user has (authentication device), or something the user is (biometric data), to verify the user’s identity. This additional layer of security significantly reduces the chances of unauthorized access.

One popular form of MFA is out-of-band authentication. This method involves using a separate communication channel, such as a mobile device, to verify the user’s identity. For example, during the login process, a one-time password (OTP) may be sent to the user’s registered mobile number. The user must enter this OTP to complete the authentication process. By using a different channel for verification, out-of-band authentication adds an extra level of security, as it is less susceptible to attacks targeting the primary authentication channel.

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Securing access to sensitive information requires a multifactor authentication approach that leverages multiple factors to establish a user’s identity. By implementing strong authentication methods, such as out-of-band authentication, organizations can ensure that only authorized individuals can gain access to confidential data, thus enhancing overall security.

Implementing Out of Band Authentication

When it comes to securing access to sensitive information and preventing unauthorized login attempts, implementing out of band authentication is a highly effective method. Out of band authentication involves the use of multiple factors for verification and identity confirmation, which significantly enhances the security of the authentication process.

One of the key factors in out of band authentication is the use of a second authentication factor in addition to a password. By requiring users to provide two separate pieces of information to access their accounts, the risk of unauthorized access is greatly reduced. This second factor can be something like a unique code sent to a user’s mobile device, or a fingerprint scan on a biometric device.

In order to implement out of band authentication, organizations generally need to invest in secure authentication methods and devices. This may include using multifactor authentication solutions that can integrate with existing login systems and provide additional layers of security. These devices can generate unique, time-sensitive codes that are sent to the user for verification purposes.

Out of band authentication also relies on the use of separate communication channels for transmitting the authentication information. For example, if the primary authentication method is a password, the second factor, such as a verification code, is typically sent to a user’s mobile device via SMS or a mobile app. This ensures that even if one channel is compromised, the other factor can still be used to verify the user’s identity.

Overall, implementing out of band authentication is a crucial step towards enhancing the security of online accounts and protecting sensitive information. By combining multiple factors and utilizing separate communication channels, organizations can significantly reduce the risk of unauthorized access and ensure that only authorized users are granted entry to their systems.

Choosing the Right Out of Band Authentication Method

When it comes to ensuring the security of access to sensitive information and systems, choosing the right out-of-band authentication method is crucial. Out-of-band authentication refers to the use of a secondary, separate channel for verification and authentication purposes. This additional layer of security helps protect against attacks such as phishing, identity theft, and account takeover.

There are several methods available for out-of-band authentication. One common method is the use of a second factor, such as a token or smart card, in addition to a password. This two-factor authentication requires users to provide something they know (the password) and something they have (the token or smart card), making it more difficult for unauthorized individuals to gain access to sensitive information.

Another out-of-band authentication method is the use of a separate device, often a mobile phone, to verify the user’s identity. This method involves sending a verification code to the user’s phone, which they then enter to complete the login process. By using a separate device, the authentication process is made more secure, as the user’s identity is confirmed through a channel that is distinct from the system they are trying to access.

It is also important to consider the use of multifactor authentication, which combines multiple out-of-band authentication methods for enhanced security. This could include, for example, the use of a password plus a token and a biometric factor, such as a fingerprint or facial recognition. By requiring multiple factors for authentication, the security of the login process is significantly increased.

Ultimately, the choice of out-of-band authentication method will depend on the specific security requirements and constraints of the system or organization. Factors such as user convenience, cost, and ease of implementation should also be taken into consideration when choosing the right method. By carefully selecting and implementing out-of-band authentication methods, organizations can greatly improve the security of their systems and protect against unauthorized access.

Integrating Out of Band Authentication with Existing Systems

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is a method of verifying the identity of a user during the login process. It adds an additional layer of security by using a separate communication channel or device for authentication, apart from the primary channel used for login. This approach ensures that even if the primary channel is compromised, the authentication process remains secure.

Integrating OOBA with existing systems requires the implementation of additional authentication methods that provide an out of band verification. One common way to achieve this is through the use of a mobile device. During the login process, a verification code or challenge is sent to the user’s mobile device, which they then enter into the login interface. This two-factor authentication adds an extra layer of security by requiring something the user knows (password) and something they have (mobile device).

To integrate OOBA with existing systems, organizations need to ensure that their authentication mechanisms are designed to support out of band verification. This can involve making changes to the login interface to accommodate the entry of verification codes or challenges. Additionally, organizations may need to establish protocols for securely transmitting the verification code or challenge to the user’s mobile device.

By integrating OOBA with existing systems, organizations can enhance the security of their authentication process. The use of multiple factors for authentication, such as something the user knows (password) and something they have (mobile device), greatly reduces the risk of unauthorized access. It also provides an additional layer of protection against common security threats, such as phishing attacks, where attackers try to trick users into disclosing their login credentials.

Best Practices for Deploying Out of Band Authentication

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is a security method that adds an additional layer of protection to the login process. It utilizes a separate device or communication channel, such as a mobile phone or email, to verify the user’s identity before granting access to a system or application.

When implementing OOBA, it is important to consider the following best practices:

  1. Implement Multifactor Authentication: Combine multiple factors of authentication, such as something the user knows (password) and something the user has (mobile device), to add an extra level of security.
  2. Use Two or More Out of Band Channels: Utilize different communication channels, such as SMS, email, voice call, or mobile app notifications, to ensure redundancy and reduce the risk of a single point of failure.
  3. Ensure Secure Communication: Employ secure methods of communication, such as encryption and strong authentication protocols, to protect the transmission of sensitive data between the user and the verification device.
  4. Keep Verification Methods Simple: Opt for user-friendly verification methods that are easy to understand and use, to encourage adoption and minimize user frustration.
  5. Regularly Update and Test Systems: Stay up to date with the latest security patches and updates for the OOBA system, and regularly test its effectiveness to identify and address any vulnerabilities.

In conclusion, deploying out of band authentication enhances security by adding an extra layer of verification and reducing the risk of unauthorized access. By following best practices, organizations can ensure a robust and reliable authentication process, protecting sensitive data and maintaining the integrity of their systems and applications.

Future Trends and Considerations

The future of authentication will be shaped by several factors. One key factor is the increasing sophistication of cyber threats, which necessitates the development of more robust methods of authentication. Traditional methods, such as password authentication, are no longer sufficient to ensure the security of login processes.

One trend that is gaining momentum is multifactor authentication (MFA). This approach combines two or more verification factors, such as a password and a biometric scan, to provide a higher level of security. MFA ensures that even if one factor is compromised, the authentication process remains secure.

Another consideration for the future of authentication is the use of out-of-band authentication. This method involves verifying the identity of a user through a separate and secure channel, such as a mobile device. By utilizing a separate channel, out-of-band authentication adds an extra layer of security, as it is more difficult for hackers to intercept the authentication process.

Identity and access management (IAM) is also an important aspect to consider in the future of authentication. IAM systems allow organizations to define and manage the access privileges of individuals within their network. By implementing IAM systems, organizations can ensure that only authorized individuals have access to sensitive information.

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Another trend to consider is the use of secure hardware devices for authentication. By utilizing dedicated hardware devices, such as smart cards or USB tokens, users can securely store their authentication credentials. These devices can be used to authenticate users when accessing sensitive systems or networks, providing an additional layer of security.

In summary, the future of authentication will require innovative approaches to ensure the security of login processes. Methods such as multifactor authentication, out-of-band authentication, identity and access management, and the use of secure hardware devices will play a crucial role in securing sensitive information.

The Role of Biometrics in Out of Band Authentication

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is a method of verifying the identity of a user by using multiple factors of authentication. One of the most secure methods of authentication involves the use of biometrics, which refers to the unique physical or behavioral characteristics of an individual.

In the context of OOBA, biometrics are utilized to enhance the security and reliability of the authentication process. By incorporating biometric factors, such as fingerprints, facial recognition, or voice recognition, into the authentication process, organizations can ensure a higher level of identity verification.

Biometrics provide a secure means of verifying an individual’s identity because these characteristics are unique to each person and cannot be easily replicated or forged. This makes it difficult for unauthorized individuals to gain access to sensitive information or systems.

When implemented in an out of band authentication system, biometrics can be used in conjunction with other factors of authentication, such as passwords or OTPs (One-Time Passwords), to further enhance security. This multifactor authentication approach adds an additional layer of protection, as it requires the user to provide multiple forms of identification before granting access.

Using biometrics in out of band authentication also offers the advantage of convenience for users. Instead of relying solely on passwords or other traditional methods of authentication, users can simply use their biometric data, such as a fingerprint or facial scan, to verify their identity. This eliminates the need to remember complex passwords and reduces the risk of password-related security breaches.

In summary, the use of biometrics in out of band authentication plays a crucial role in improving security. By incorporating unique physical or behavioral characteristics, organizations can ensure a more secure and reliable authentication process. Biometrics offer a convenient and efficient means of identity verification, making it an ideal choice for enhancing the security of sensitive information and systems.

Emerging Technologies for Out of Band Authentication

Out of Band Authentication (OOBA) is an identity verification method that utilizes two or more factors to provide secure access to a login or system. The authentication process typically involves the use of a second communication channel or device, separate from the one being accessed, to verify the identity of the user.

Emerging technologies for out of band authentication are constantly evolving to enhance security measures. One such technology is multifactor authentication, which combines two or more factors such as something the user knows (like a password), something the user has (like a mobile device), or something the user is (like a biometric identifier).

In addition to multifactor authentication, there are various other methods being developed to improve the security of out of band authentication. One method involves the use of geolocation data, where the user’s physical location is verified to ensure that the authentication request is coming from an expected location.

Another emerging technology for out of band authentication is push notifications. With this method, a user receives a notification on their mobile device asking for authorization when they attempt to log in to a system. The user can then approve or deny the login request directly from their device.

Furthermore, some organizations are exploring the use of biometric authentication methods for out of band authentication. This involves using unique physical or behavioral characteristics, such as fingerprints or voice recognition, to verify the user’s identity.

Overall, emerging technologies for out of band authentication aim to provide a more secure and reliable means of verifying user identities. By utilizing multiple factors and incorporating innovative methods such as geolocation verification, push notifications, and biometric authentication, organizations can enhance the security of their systems and protect against unauthorized access.

Addressing Challenges and Potential Risks

Implementing out-of-band authentication methods can help address several challenges and potential risks associated with traditional single-factor authentication.

One of the main challenges is the reliance on a single factor, typically a password, for user verification. Passwords can be easily guessed or stolen, putting user accounts at risk. By adding an additional factor to the authentication process, such as a one-time code sent to a user’s mobile device, it becomes much harder for unauthorized individuals to gain access to a user’s account.

Furthermore, out-of-band authentication enhances security by utilizing a separate communication channel for the verification process. This helps protect against attacks that attempt to intercept or manipulate the authentication process. By sending the verification code through a different channel, such as a text message, email, or a secondary device, the risk of interception is significantly reduced.

Another challenge that out-of-band authentication helps address is identity theft. With single-factor authentication, it can be difficult to verify the identity of the individual attempting to log in. By introducing an additional factor that is tied to the user’s device or contact information, the risk of impersonation or unauthorized access is minimized.

Implementing out-of-band authentication methods, especially in combination with other multifactor authentication factors, provides an added layer of security to user accounts. By requiring the user to verify their identity using a separate communication channel or device, it becomes much more difficult for attackers to gain unauthorized access. This not only helps protect sensitive information but also enhances user confidence in the security of their account.

FAQ about topic “Understanding Out of Band Authentication and Its Impact on Security”

What is out of band authentication?

Out of band authentication is a security measure that involves verifying a user’s identity using a separate communication channel or method outside of the primary communication channel or method being used for the transaction. It adds an extra layer of security by requiring users to confirm their identity through a different channel, such as a text message or phone call, before granting access or completing a transaction.

How does out of band authentication improve security?

Out of band authentication improves security by reducing the risk of fraudulent activities, such as unauthorized access or identity theft. By using a separate communication channel for authentication, it makes it harder for attackers to intercept and manipulate the authentication process. Even if an attacker can compromise the primary channel, they would still need access to the secondary communication channel to complete the authentication process.

What are some common examples of out of band authentication?

Some common examples of out of band authentication include receiving a verification code via SMS or email, receiving an automated phone call to confirm a transaction, or using a hardware token or mobile app to generate a one-time password. These methods ensure that the authentication process is conducted through a separate and trusted channel, making it more secure.

Are there any drawbacks or limitations to out of band authentication?

While out of band authentication can greatly enhance security, there are some drawbacks and limitations to consider. One potential limitation is the reliance on additional hardware or technology, such as mobile phones or hardware tokens, which may not always be readily available. There is also a potential for delays or difficulties in receiving the authentication code or confirmation via the secondary channel, which could result in inconvenience for users. Additionally, if the secondary channel is compromised, it could still potentially lead to unauthorized access.

Is out of band authentication suitable for all types of transactions?

Out of band authentication is generally suitable for most types of transactions that require a high level of security. It is especially beneficial for sensitive transactions, such as online banking, financial transactions, or accessing highly confidential information. However, for some low-risk transactions or situations where convenience is a priority, out of band authentication may not be necessary or practical.

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